Alamo Alliance

regions

We at AlamoAlliance.org assert that the traditions, customs and language of the United States of America represent a distinctive American culture that is unique to the United States.

We believe that the American culture is a product of the fundamental principles of self-government, self-reliance, liberty and justice as set forth by our founders in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

These guiding principles and the shared experience of the American people over two centuries, in war and peace and in times of hardship and plenty, have created the uniquely American Heritage.
We assert that it is the duty of the government of the United States to protect and preserve the common heritage, traditions, and language of America.

We further assert that the United States of America is a Sovereign Nation with the right to accept or reject any application for citizenship in our regions (www.regions-et-departements.fr).

Written into the Constitution of the United States, in Article IV, Section 4, the government of the United States guarantees to protect the States from invasion.

It is our belief that in the United States today, are 20 to 30 million illegal aliens. Our government has willfully neglected and completely failed in its Constitutional duty to protect the States from invasion and has willfully neglected and completely failed in it’s duty to enforce the duly enacted laws of the United States Congress.

We demand that the government of the United States abide by the established laws of the United States Congress and the United States Constitution.

It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people’s minds!
– Samuel Adams

Send an email or a letter to your Representatives and tell them NO to SPP,
NO Amnesty, No Guest Worker Programs and NO Open Borders!

Tell the Government to enforce our laws! SIGN THE PETITION!
The Attrition Solution

The debate on immigration reform has been convoluted by pro-amnesty advocates to make it appear that there are only two alternatives - mass round-ups and deportation of illegal
We at AlamoAlliance.org assert that the traditions, customs and language of the United States of America represent a distinctive American culture that is unique to the United States.

We believe that the American culture is a product of the fundamental principles of self-government, self-reliance, liberty and justice as set forth by our founders in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

These guiding principles and the shared experience of the American people over two centuries, in war and peace and in times of hardship and plenty, have created the uniquely American Heritage.
We assert that it is the duty of the government of the United States to protect and preserve the common heritage, traditions, and language of America.

We further assert that the United States of America is a Sovereign Nation with the right to accept or reject any application for citizenship.

Written into the Constitution of the United States, in Article IV, Section 4, the government of the United States guarantees to protect the States from invasion.

It is our belief that in the United States today, are 20 to 30 million illegal aliens. Our government has willfully neglected and completely failed in its Constitutional duty to protect the States from invasion and has willfully neglected and completely failed in it’s duty to enforce the duly enacted laws of the United States Congress.

We demand that the government of the United States abide by the established laws of the United States Congress and the United States Constitution.

Won’t you join us?
Our Privacy Policy: We do not share your information with anyone…Period! The only exception is when our petitions are delivered to the designated political officials for which they are intended.
Copyright © 2006 Alamo Alliance All Rights Reserved
Are the SPP and the NASCO Corridor
good for America?

Is the “Reconquista” real?

Border Security
Alamo Alliance endorses the following Border Enforcement Strategy consisting of a multi-year plan to secure America’s borders and effectively halt illegal migration. The first phase calls for
A Common
Sense Platform
Out of control immigration is not a Democrat or Republican issue; it is an American issue. Americans can and will disagree on many issues depending upon

Reform the immigration debate. Sen. Sessions comments on the Pence - Hutchison Proposal

The Pence-Hutchison immigration-reform proposal, like the other prominent plans, fails to address critical issues relating to meaningful immigration reform. It must not become law.

The legislation fails to provide a real solution for a number of important reasons. Namely, the proposal: 1) will allow for a virtually unlimited number of immigrants to come to the United States; 2) favors low-skilled workers; 3) provides more preferences to the eight NAFTA and CAFTA countries over the rest of the world; and 4) gives no preference for English-language or employment skills that help make immigrants successful in our dynamic economy.
This plan swallows hook, line and sinker the idea that as long as there is a foreign worker wanting to come to America, and an American company that wants to hire the individual, the foreign worker should be admitted, allowed to work and put on a path to citizenship. This concept violates the principle followed by every other nation in the world, that immigration policy should be based on the needs of the nation, not the desires of those that want low-cost labor.
Under the Pence-Hutchison plan, foreign workers will initially be granted two-year work visas, automatically renewable for an additional 12 years. Then the foreign worker is given an “X-Change” visa, newly created by the legislation. After five years, the “X-Change” visa will allow the worker to transition to permanent resident status (a green card holder). Permanent residents are entitled to citizenship after five years. Because “temporary” workers will have the right to bring their families, the right to stay and work for 17 years and then the right to stay permanently, the vast majority will certainly do so.
A temporary worker program can play an important role in our immigration reform policy, but the Pence-Hutchison proposal, like the flawed Senate bill, does not create a real “temporary” worker program. To be truly “temporary,” the workers’ stay must be limited, for instance, to 10 months each year, and they cannot be allowed to bring dependents. This is common sense — we cannot expect that workers invited to move their entire families to America and live here for years will want to go home. Who will uproot these long-settled families if they become temporarily unemployed? The answer is that no one will.
Foreign workers entering under this proposal will overwhelmingly be low-skilled. It is well documented that such workers will cost the U.S. Treasury far more than they will ever pay in taxes. A flood of low-skilled workers will further depress wages for American workers who compete with them for jobs. There is a basic economic truth that cannot be escaped — an excess of labor drives down wages, a shortage of labor causes wages to rise. Few dispute that in recent years lower-wage earners have seen their wages decline. Professor George Borjas of Harvard, the leading expert in the field, reports that immigration has already reduced the incomes of low-skilled workers by as much as 8 percent, or $1,200 per year. For a family making around $25,000 a year, a decrease such as this can be the difference in making it or not.
By limiting the new program to only NAFTA and CAFTA countries, the bill would be a further and dramatic tilt to Mexico, Canada, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, over every other country in the world. At a recent Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, a witness for the Irish Lobby for Immigration Reform, Nial O’Dowd, explained that “if the Irish antecedents of Andrew Jackson, John F. Kennedy or Ronald Reagan were trying to enter the United States today” they could not get in legally. He justified his comment by noting that “of the 1 million green card visas given out last year, about 2,000 went to the Irish.” Irish settlers helped form this nation yet, amazingly, they received only two-tenths of one percent of our green cards last year.
Finally, in establishing a good immigration policy for the United States through comprehensive reform, it is critical to decide the number of immigrants we can accept and the skills we want them to possess. Clearly, these decisions should be based on the national interest, not special interests. Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand, developed nations all, have objective employment-based immigration policies, usually centered on a merit-based points system used to evaluate which potential immigrants will contribute the most to their society and take full advantage of citizenship opportunities. Why are we not considering reforms to our immigration system that take these important issues into account?
The need for border and workplace enforcement is a given. What we have lacked in this discussion is a serious evaluation of the merit-based policies other developed nations have adopted. Neither have we had a real discussion of the number of immigrants that America should admit annually. Without such a discussion, good comprehensive reform cannot occur.

Sen. Jeff Sessions, Alabama Republican, is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

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Aztlan Agenda Propaganda Documents Revealed!
July 9th, 2006 by alamoalliance
Art Oliver, a Libertarian running for Governor of California, received a package at his campaign office just a few days ago. Where the return address should have been, was a Mexican flag sticker. When Art opened the package, inside was a Mexican flag and three documents.

The documents are “El Plan de Aztlan”. We’ve posted the documents for all to see on our website here: http://alamoalliance.org/ao.html. These documents outline a clear plan for “Reconquista”, or the reconquering of a vast section of the southwest portion of the United States, by populating this area with hispanic immigrants, legal and illegal, with the intention of creating an independent nation, apart from the United States.

You’d better wake up America, this plan is REAL and is being implemented as we speak.

Our plan is to secure newspaper advertising nationwide, in an effort to wake this nation up to the illegal migration crisis in America. However nationwide newspaper advertisements are very expensive and beyond our budget at this time. Would you consider donating to see these documents published in major newspapers nationwide?

If you would like to make a safe and secure online donation to this cause, please go here: http://alamoalliance.org/donate.html

Thank you in advance! We’re very anxious to get these documents into homes nationwide, before the November elections!

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The ‘Reconquista’—Mexico’s Dream of ‘Retaking’ the Southwest
June 2nd, 2006 by alamoalliance
By John Tiffany

Some Mexicans and Mexican-Americans want to see California, New Mexico and other parts of the United States given to Mexico. They call it the “reconquista,” Spanish for “reconquest,” and they view the millions of Mexican illegal aliens entering this country as their army of invaders to achieve that takeover. To an extent, they also have actual armed soldiers of the Mexican army, along with mercenaries from North Korea, Russia and other communist or former communist lands, and have already fired upon American Border Patrol officers and terrorized American ranchers. Shockingly, certain politicians in
America are willing to sell out to the Mexicans. Here we consider the background to this disturbing development.

Mexico, of course, was once a Spanish colony, the Aztecs and numerous other tribes in that region having been conquered by the Spaniards—or, in many cases, having willingly sworn allegiance to the Spanish king in order to free themselves from Aztec tyranny. (However, it may be noted that in the northern reaches—the so-called Interior Provinces—of what was once called “Mexico,” the natives had never been subdued by any outsiders, including the Aztecs.) When a number of Mexicans, inspired by Ameri ca’s example, revolted againstSpain, they set up an independent government and assumed theoretical rulership of a vast area, in cluding what is now known as the South western United States.

America subsequently obtained the Southwest in various ways—mostly by conquest in the Mexican (or Mexican Amer i can) War, partly by purchase (the Gadsden Purchase) and partly by agreement (the annexation of Texas, at the time an independent republic. It should also be mentioned that the bear flag of the Republic of California was raised by American settlers at Sonoma on June 14, 1846.) This prompts the question as to how
Spain and then Mexico came to “own” what is now the American Southwest, which, of course, was never under the control of the Aztec nation.

Mexico’s claim to the Southwest stems from Pope Alexander VI’s 15th-century Treaty of Tordesillas, which established a demarcation line to define the spheres of Spanish and Portuguese influence in the New World. The line ran due north and south through a point 300 miles west of the Azores and Cape Verde Islands. All newly discovered lands lying east of this line supposedly belonged to Portugal, while all lands discovered to the west belonged to Spain. The people—Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts—living in these lands were not consulted. This treaty was modified in 1506 by a new demarcation line 1,110 miles west of the Azores. The new line ran longitudinally through the eastern hump of
South America, and is the reason Brazilians speak Portuguese. This treaty gave
Spain the controversial legitimacy to rule Mexico, and most of North and
South America, beginning with Her nándo Cortés’s rape of the Aztec nation in 1521. Tordesillas allowed the Spanish and Portuguese to loot and enslave indigenous populations, in return for their promises to save the hemisphere’s natives “for God.” It was not realized at the time that Portugal would get a much smaller slice of the American pie than did Spain, since the Americas were still largely unexplored. While
Spain wound up with a claim to the Aztec and Inca empires, rich in gold and silver,
Portugal got nothing more than some tropical rain forest with scattered primitive tribes.

Britain and various other countries, including Catholic France, were not hap py about the pope’s decision to divide the New World between Spain and Portugal and did not consider the treaty to have any legal value whatsoever. Even Portu gal seems to have been dissatisfied, since it proceeded to carve out a much larger Brazil than the eastern
Brazil it would have been entitled to under the treaty. Since the United States inherited its claim to the western lands from Britain, the Treaty of Tordesillas is logically a nullity as far as the U.S. government is (or should be) concerned. It should perhaps be noted that
U.S. claims to the west really go as far back as colonial days, since many of the British colonial charters purported to grant to the colonies lands in America stretching all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

In 1767, Russia had already taken overAlaska and was looking at lands to the south of it. King Carlos III of Spain became concerned about Russian intentions regarding
California and decreed a program to build a series of forts or missions throughout
California to ensure Spanish control of that land. The Spanish government forced the aboriginal Ameri can (so-called “Indian”) populations to build a series of 21 forts/missions for settler protection and agriculture. These missions were built between 1769 and 1823. Because of a series of revolutions that swept the Spanish empire in 1810, cash-starved
Spain stopped salary payments to its civil servants throughout the Ameri cas, and these colonists were left to their own devices. It is noteworthy that in 1810, there were less than 1,000 Span iards through out the entire American South west, some 500,000 square miles of wil derness, controlled only by the native Indians.1

At one point the civilized Indian tribes of New Mexico, known as “Pueblo” Indi ans, who had been conquered by the Span ish, revolted and succeeded in driving the Spanish out of their lands. The Span ish government, however, mounted a “re conquista” to again subject this territory to their control, the first reconquista in Amer ican history. (An earlier reconquista found in the history books refers to the taking back of Spain itself from the Moors by the Christians, but of course that has little to do with our subject matter here.)

It took a combination of Criollos (ethnic Spaniards born in the New World), Indians associated with them and Mestizos (racially mixed people) to defeat Imperial Spain; but by 1821, after 38 years of struggle, they triumphed, and modern Mexico was born. However, the defeat of Spain changed little in what would someday be the Southwest United States. The vast wilderness, which was then northern Mexico, continued to be virtually ignored by a slumbering and distracted Mexican central government. From the time of Spain’s defeat by Mexico in 1821, through 1848, the year the Mexican-American War ended, Mexico endured 50 military plots, 22 governments, five constitutional conventions, three constitutions and 10 of the 11 different terms of leadership under that megalomaniacal president and military leader (he was never actually a general), Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón, of Alamo notoriety.

Beginning with Texas in 1845, which be came a sovereign country in 1836, and California, Nevada, Utah and parts of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Wyo ming (all of which Mexico ceded to the United States in 1848), American settlers outnumbered Mexicans by at least five to one in all eight states except in Texas, where Americans outnumbered Mexicans 10 to one. One thing these settlers wanted was stable, representative government, something Mexico had been unable to provide. They also wanted to have a government that spoke their own language and shared their culture. And so had begun the inevitable movement for independence from Mexico among American settlers. This led to the Battle of the Alamo and the Texan War for Independence, resulting in a sovereign nation of Texas. After nine years of this, Texas, by mutual consent, was annexed to the
United States.